Shadoe Rose: Part Twenty-EightMature

April 24, 1725

            Although I
am feeling much better after what my family now calls “the incident,” I am
still confined to my bed. Father is worried that I have a new illness and
wishes to do everything in his power to keep me well. Mother, as usual, frets
and wrings her hands constantly, while ordering servants to bring cold cloths
and an endless variety of soups and broths to revive me, even though I am
fine.
Can they not see that? I am better than ever, yet they continue to
worry. Even Christelle, the flighty and slow girl that she is, has commented on
how my skin seems pale as death and my veins show through. My entire family
believes me to have an imbalance in humors, but there is no physician near to
do the bloodletting, and mother will not have anyone else do it. She fears of
scarring my skin or that someone else will do it wrong and surely kill me.

 

 

April 25, 1725

            Dmitri came
to sit with me today. Of everyone in the whole family, he is the only one who
still treats me like all is normal. The rest of the family speaks in whispers
of how they all believe I will die soon. They all worriedly speak of how
quickly I am wasting away. They do not understand that allowing me to journey
to my hideaway in the woods will revive me.

            As
Dmitri came to talk to me, I asked if he could take me out to the woods. I told
him I would ride with him, and that out there is what will cure me. He wondered
why it could not be brought here, and lacking a proper answer, I merely told
him it could not. I must go back out. He seemed to think on this for a few
moments, then gave in and decided to take me out there. And as both parents
have forbidden me to leave my chambers, Dmitri said that we shall leave after
they both leave to find me a physician and a priest. They both fear the worst
for me.

S.R.

            Dmitri has let me ride
on his own horse, his prized stallion named Louis, to the woods. No one else is
allowed to touch his horse, not even the stable hands. This showed me how
little faith my family has in my recovery. I may appear as a ghost, but this
sojourn to the woods shall be all the medicine I need.

            I gave directions to my
brother as he led Louis out there. When I am not walking, I realize how truly
far this place is from the manor. Dmitri has commented on the distance only to
ask how I was able to make this journey nearly every day for two weeks. I told
him that he would understand once we were there.

            Once we arrived, Dmitri
lifted me from the saddle and carried me to the large rock where I normally sit
when I am here. Immediately, the air and energy here revived me, and Dmitri
later said that I grew healthier and fleshed out before his eyes. He believes I
have found the fountain of youth. I laughed and told him that what I had found
was better.

April 27, 1725

            Mother and father have
not returned until this morning. I did not know we lived that far from other
people. Both parents were shocked at my appearance when they returned. They
exclaimed that it was a miracle from God that I am cured. They do not know that
God has nothing to do with it.

            Mother has begged the
physician to stay in case my condition fails again. The priest eyed me
suspiciously with his cold eyes and asked to speak to me privately. When we
were alone in the hall, he asked if I had been consorting with dark forces. I
tilted my head and asked what gave him that idea, and he frowned and said that
God was nowhere near me, that I was too full of darkness. And then, something
incredible happened. I moved my hand to dismiss his words, and as I did, he
flew across the hall and crashed into a door. Mother ran out when she heard the
noise and called loudly for the physician, but it was in vain. The priest was
dead.

            As the crowd gathered
around the body in the hallway, I smiled. I had never felt better.

The End

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