South

 The sun glitters warm and hot in the clearest of blue skies. Below a river, Al'nair, bends it's way from the North and weaves it's way across the southern plains, a silver ribbon streaking through the land.

  Even farther south, the river dumps into the Unar Lake, where a forrests buds about it called the Fardian. It's wide expanse is but meager compared to the Northland woods where the mystical elves roam with the stangest of magic.

  It is here, on the plains by the Al'nair and the wood about the Unar, that Humans were said to have developed. Mortal, rugged beasts compared to those of the North, with sun tanned skin and beards to the liking of the mountain dwarves. Savages at first arrival, hunted by the likes of dragons, the other sharer of the plains.

  Dragons, with their amazing abilities and deep intelligence, flew the plains thousands of years before the Human Race appeared upon it. They would hunt and mate as they pleased, while winging their way to the mountains northeast ways-a short flight compared to the many day treke even for the athletic elves-to rest in the caves and caverns, make nests, and snatch up any dwarves of that escaped their deep, dark tunnels.  

  It was not long, though, that a curious band of humans walked their way North, and came upon a wandering elf. As legend told, this elf, named Unaaldri, had been cast of the Council of Elves, when she had murdered another councilmember in cold blood. The punishment suffered was not death, but worse; to be expelled from the elves' home and elves' company eternally and to be burned at the stake if she returned.

   Unaaldri, full of a wealth of information from her unnumbered years of life, met these very animal like humans and befriended them in a way. She taught them the Elven language, which they mixed their own rough tongue, and many other constuctive things that would guide them along to a much more intelligent existance. The few curious wandering humans, young men to say the least, soon became the wisest of their tribes and lead as chiefs, and later, their great-grandsons and further onwards, kings of nations.

The End

8 comments about this story Feed