Age of Miracles Ch. 8-16

In these chapters, a huge government announcement is made that has a great effect on that society. Julia on the other hand continues living (and dealing) with her family, going to school, and living everyday life. At one point, she even comes to realize that one of her very important friends has found someone else to spend all her time with. At the end of the chapters, Julia's vision of her father will never be the same...

In “The Age of Miracles,” chapters 9-16, the days and nights continue to grow, and a huge government announcement is made in chapter 9: society is following clock time - the 24-hour system we are all familiar with. This causes concern, confused feelings, and even some worry to Julia’s family. This also causes a separation in society, because not everyone will choose to follow clock time (which is followed by most people and public places/jobs.) When following clock-time, day no longer means light, and night no longer means dark. Because of this, the characters have to adapt to sometimes sleeping in the day and working/going to school at night. Insomnia became an issue, even affecting Julia’s mother to a good extent. This causes a rise in many things, like sleeping pills and blackout curtains.   

The time setting of the novel seems to match up to the present real world. Technology, society, and the way of life of the people in the novel are the same as current society. Also, disregarding the drastic central conflict in the novel, the everyday struggles/obstacles that Julia, the protagonist, faces are quite similar to struggles of young adults in the real world. In these chapters, Julia continues living (and dealing) with her family, going to school, and living everyday life. At one point, she even comes to realize that one of her very important friends has found someone else to spend all her time with. Then later on, after a telescope is placed by her window, Julia catches her own father doing the unimaginable: cheating on her mother with Sylvia...

“The Age of Miracles,” covers many things and contains different themes that I consider to be good and important. This includes (but is not limited to): Coming-of-age, catastrophe, coping, friendship and family, stereotypes, drama, and love. The way these things are portrayed in the novel allow me to think and make connections to the story, and even if the topic itself isnt' "good", the outcome of it is. This allows me to think about my opinions and beliefs in a new way. Not necessarily challenge them or change them, but to gain a better understanding of my world based off of the events in the story.

I really enjoy “The Age of Miracles,” and would definitely recommend it to anyone that is capable of doing so. It is my favorite class-related reads of the school year so far. The text is interesting, engaging, creative, and sometimes even relatable. The text itself is well-written and the plot is good. The novel keeps me entertained and it is very hard to put down! I really do love it.

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