Watashi Wa Yume Akane Desu

"Um, excuse me, Hane-san" I said. Hane-san and Tenshi-san flinched at my voice as they looked round.

"Akumu-san!" they said togather, sounding shocked and scared.

"This fell out of your bag," I told Hane-san, holding out the pencil that had fallen to the floor.

"Um... No, it's okay, you keep it!" she said hurriedly, and the two of them disappeared faster than you could say chizu.

I sighed. Why did everyone hate me so much? Even my foster parents hated me.

Okay, so I was a British girl in Tokyo, the capital city of Japan.

Most Japanese people tend to have light brown skin, dark brown or black hair and dark brown eyes. Most. Some don't.

So as English people tend to have lighter skin, hair in various shades of blonde, brown, red and black, and blue, green, brown or grey eyes, it was natural that I would stand out a little. But this much?

I'm not your average British girl appearance. I'm albino.

With white hair, red pupilled pink eyes and snow pale skin, I was a source of terror for my classmates and the public in general. I often overheard people commenting that I was a kyuuketsuki, kichiku or akuryou. My name was Akane, but I hadn't been called that for years. With my surname, Yume, it had resulted in the nickname often thought to be an unfortunate given name - Akumu.

I couldn't take this much longer. I was going to get out, out of Tokyo, maybe even off Honshu.

I was going to run away.

_______________________________________________________

Right.

Chizu can translate as either map or, in this case, cheese. I couldn't think what else to put.

Kyuuketsuki, kichiku and akuryou translate as 'vampire', 'demon' and 'evil spirit' respectively.

Akane is Japanese for 'dark red', whilst Yume means 'dream'. Akane-san's nickname, Akumu, means 'nightmare.

Honshu is the biggest of the four main islands that make up Japan.

The Japanese write their surname before their first name.

I am not Japanese. I just like Japan.

I am not albino either.

The End

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